September’s Global Climate Strike and its Relevance at BC:

Joseph Gordon and Kemi Iyageh

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On September 20th, millions of people marched for climate justice to be recognized and strived for by government officials worldwide. About 4,638 events were planned in 139 countries, tweeted Greta Thunberg, a global strike organizer and environment activist.

 

Kemi I. (‘22) was inspired to go to the climate strike because she wanted to get involved and show her support for climate justice, since she believes that “climate change should be recognized by politicians worldwide as a global threat. I wanted to help make a difference and inspire change along with other like-minded people.”

 

Olivia Bennett (‘21), co-leader of the Environmental Club, said that Berkeley Carroll’s participation in climate strikes is a “big way for our student voices to be heard,” and the Environmental Club wanted to “make the BC community more aware of current issues” while also partaking in global citizenship, a philosophy highly valued by the Berkeley Carroll community. 

 

It is essential that people start taking action now because although it may not be directly affecting you right now, it will,” explained Olivia. She also noted the drastic effects greenhouse gases have on climate change, adding that such changes in weather have led to natural disasters such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and extreme coastal flooding, which are “destroying people’s homes and lives.” 

 

In the future, the Environmental Club hopes to do even more to raise awareness for climate justice, and welcomes suggestions from the BC community. The Environmental Club is currently planning events such as clothing drives, bake sales, and more. When asked what individuals can do to combat climate change, Olivia concluded by explaining that doing seemingly small things, like not littering and not using plastic bags, can have a huge impact on the world. Olivia added that, “the biggest thing [members of the BC community] can do to raise awareness is to research and educate themselves on this issue.” 

 

 

 

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